Washington Heights Landmarks

Washington Heights Landmarks

History, art, and nature come together in the vibrant streets of Washington Heights. The neighborhood offers plenty of scenic landmarks that blend urban living with the beauty of nature. Read below to learn all about the neighborhood’s must-do historic landmarks. How many have you yet to see?

 

Little Red Lighthouse

photo by Chris Bastian on Flickr

photo by Chris Bastian on Flickr

This quaint lighthouse splashed in a bright shade of red is located in scenic Fort Washington Park. The only standing lighthouse in Manhattan was intended to guide ships coming in from the river into the dangerous area of Jeffrey’s Hook. Even though it’s no longer in use, the lighthouse offers scenic views to the Hudson River and the New Jersey skyline. It’s peculiar name comes from the popular children’s book “The Little Red Lighthouse and the Big Grey Bridge.” Enjoy the gorgeous views with an outdoor picnic and stay to watch the sunset in this must-see Washington Heights site.

Sylvan Terrace

photo by Karen Green on Flickr

photo by Karen Green on Flickr

Sylvan Terrace, much like Pomander Walk on the Upper West Side, is one of the secret gems of Washington Heights. This historic street leads up to the Morris-Jamel Mansion on one end and was built with cobblestone imported from Belgium. 19th century wooden row units line up the block and sport an identical design that’s perfectly symmetrical. Sylvan Terrace was originally intended to be used as a path for carriage horses that were traveling to the Mansion. Nowadays, residents occupy the apartments and home prices are bubbling just below the million dollar mark. Take a stroll through this magical place and step into another time.

George Washington Bridge

photo by d.aniela on Flickr

photo by d.aniela on Flickr

The George Washington Bridge connects the city to neighboring New Jersey and offers spectacular views to the Hudson River, the Garden State, and even Midtown! The historic bridge was considered to be the longest suspension structure of it’s kind in the world. That changed once the Golden Gate in San Francisco was completed during the late 1930’s. The GWB does still hold the title as the busiest bridge in the world. More than 100 million vehicles cross it every year. The bridge comes with two levels, a walking path for pedestrians, and a bike path for fitness enthusiasts.

The GWB was built in 1927 as part of the Port of New York Authority project. The bridge’s majestic steel towers were supposed to be made out of granite and concrete before the Great Depression hit the city. On the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks and other annual holidays such as Independence Day, the bridge lifts up the world’s largest free-flying American flag.

Hudson View Gardens

photo by Asaavedra32 on Flickr

photo by Asaavedra32 on Flickr

Hudson View Gardens is the oldest co-op complex in the city and was added to the National Register of Historic Places just this year. The co-op is located in the heart of the neighborhood between Pinehurst Avenue and Cabrini Boulevard. The beautiful housing complex was developed after city planners were looking for a way to attract suburban middle classes into the city. The completion of Hudson View Gardens offered a viable solution towards those who wanted the convenience of suburban living inside of an urban environment. The co-op is known for it’s community spirit and there are lots of fun events held year-round. The building was designed by noted architect George F. Pelham and comes with lots of open and green space including a rose garden and a private children’s playground.

Jay Hood Wright Park

photo from NYCGOVPARKS.ORG

photo from NYCGOVPARKS.ORG

The Jay Hood Wright Park counts with lots of green beauty and great scenic viewpoints of the George Washington Bridge. The name of the park derives after that of wealthy banker J. Hood Wright. He used to own the land that now belongs to the park and was a well-known philanthropist. His charitable donations helped establish the Washington Heights branch of the New York Public Library system. Wright is honored with a plaque in his name right at the entrance. The family friendly park has an amazing playground with a miniature replica of the George Washington Bridge. There are also sports facilities including a basketball court and plenty of trails for dog and nature lovers alike.

Related Posts:

Washington Heights Monuments and Statues

History of Washington Heights

Washington Heights Churches

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Edgar Catasus

Edgar is a a film fanatic, a food lover, and an Upper West Side enthusiast. After working in PR and marketing in Chicago, he is pursuing his dream of becoming a writer. He loves photography and on his spare time you can find him hiking or biking the great outdoors (while also snapping some pretty awesome Instagram pics!).

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